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My garage rebuilding project

  I've been rebuilding my old garage for the past two weeks. When we bought our house a year ago, it was described as a "tear-down", and after a year of living here I finally understood why. I kind of liked the falling down look, and it didn't seem to interfere with it's functionality (i.e., keep the car safe, store lots of junk).

But then I noticed it was leaning a lot, and it turned out it had been built without a foundation, just the two by fours sitting on dirt. It was probably at least 50 years old (maybe as old as the house, which was built in 1915), and about 20 years ago an electric garage door had been installed, and at that time a few extra 2 x 4's had been nailed in so that the opener didn't bring the whole thing down...

Anyway, it was a small garage, very dark, falling down, and there was about 2 feet on either side of it to the neighbours fences that was just a nice little habitat for rats and weed trees. Aidan went to a camp this summer at a nieghbour's house and they'd turned their garage into this neat art space by putting clear plastic corrugation instead of a roof on garage-like building.

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Comments

Anonymous said…
Where is the rest of your garage story. I am interested in hearing what you did because my garage seems to be in a similar state.
Alan Dixon said…
It's finished, or at least as finished as such projects ever are. My only regret was that I used the cheaper roofing, which hasn't weathered very well. I really like that I can keep my barbeque back there and use it all year, and I've got a great little tool section as well.

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