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Me and Features

It started off with a 5 minute presentation at a DUG-TO monthly meetup about OpenAtrium and the new Center for Social Innovation Community Site.

Then Kahlid asked me to come do a real presentation at their Waterloo group. That presentation is now up here:



After my presentation, Khalid said he was hoping for more details about the Features module, so when I was thinking about what I could offer to Toronto Drupal Camp, I decided on a straightforward intro/presentation. That went surprisingly well (considering that I don't usually do "straightforward" very well), and now I've ended up feeling like a Features ambassador, evidenced by the following diplomatic photo:



Thanks to Chris Luckhardt

Short answer: I use Features on all my new projects of any size bigger than tiny and encourage other developers to also. It's not (yet?) the holy grail, but it's definitely an essential tool for managing the ongoing development of any site. Want to know more? Check the links off the drupal camp session description

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