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Drupal 7 migration: a script for image + image_attach

Inspired by this post:

http://rarepattern.com/nodes/2012/recovering-contrib-image-modules-content-upgrade-drupal-7

I thought I'd dig out and contribute a script I wrote for a similar issue I had with a number of old sites.

Specifically - in the old days before imagecache, one way to safely enable your site editors to add pictures to posts was using a combination of the image module with the image attach module. Functionally, most of the sites I've seen it on were doing the same thing as the imagecache, only not as well, and now that D7 is mainstream I can't prolong keeping it going any longer.

The main difference with Laura's post above is trying to deal with the image attachment bit - i.e. getting the images into the fields of the posts to which the original image nodes where being 'attached'.

The other key difference - this script was written for D6, so do this before you do your D7 upgrade. It's making use of the D6 table structure, it's not written using high-level api's! D7's table structure is much more complicated, so trying to do this after the D7 upgrade would be more difficult I suspect.

Also: doing this only with a script would be too general a tool I think. In any case, I simplified the problem by manually creating the new image fields and then hard coding those field names into my script.

Conclusion: feel free to recycle my script below, but make sure you

1. create the new fields first, and then modify my "$convert" array below.
2. try it on a dev copy first. Also, you'll see some commented out code that I uncomment on the first run as a way of checking out what it will do.

Notes: because an image node image can be attached to multiple nodes, i'm copying the original image files, not reusing them in their same location. So when you're done, you can remove the files/image directory where the image module put it's stuff.





// code to convert image module use to imagecache



$convert = array(
  'newsletter_article' => 'field_newsletter_image',
  'page' => 'field_page_image',
  'press' => 'field_press_image',
 );

// you can run this code first to see what sizes were being attached to which node types
/* foreach(node_get_types() as $type => $info) {
  $image_attach = variable_get("image_attach_$type",'');
  if ($image_attach) {
    echo "\n $type";   
    echo db_result(db_query('DESC content_type_'.$type));
  }
} */
$sizes = variable_get('image_sizes','');
// print_r($sizes); die();

foreach($convert as $type => $image_field) {
  //echo $image_field;
  $iff = $image_field.'_fid';
  $config = db_fetch_object(db_query("SELECT * FROM {content_node_field_instance} WHERE field_name = '%s'",$image_field));
  $settings = unserialize($config->widget_settings);
  $dir = file_create_path($settings['file_path']);
  // print_r($config);
  // print_r($settings);
  $status = file_check_directory($dir,(FILE_CREATE_DIRECTORY | FILE_MODIFY_PERMISSIONS));
  if (!$status) {
    die("Unable to create directory!!!");
    // TODO: for rfc, i don't have directory create permission, need to run initialization as nobody
  }
  // for each image, move the _original one to the new directory, 
  // remove the other ones, and update the db
  $result = db_query("SELECT n.vid,ia.*,i.fid FROM {node} n INNER JOIN {image_attach} ia ON n.nid = ia.nid INNER JOIN {image} i on ia.iid = i.nid AND i.image_size = '_original' WH
ERE n.type = '%s'",$type);
  while ($ia = db_fetch_object($result)) {
    $file = db_fetch_object(db_query("SELECT * FROM files where fid = %d",$ia->fid));
    $name = basename($filepath = $file->filepath);
    // print_r($ia);
    // die("$old_path -> $new_path");
    // get the current fid!
    $good = file_copy($filepath,$settings['file_path'],FILE_EXISTS_REPLACE);
    if (!$good) {
      print_r($file); print_r($ia); die($filepath);
    }
    else {
      db_query("INSERT INTO {files} (uid,filename,filepath,filemime,filesize,status,timestamp) VALUES (%d,'%s','%s','%s',%d,%d,%d)",$file->uid,$name,$filepath,$file->filemime,$fil
e->filesize,1,time());
      $fid = db_last_insert_id('files','fid');
      if (!db_result(db_query("SELECT vid FROM {content_type_$type} WHERE vid = %d",$ia->vid))) {
        db_query("INSERT INTO {content_type_$type} (nid,vid,$iff) VALUES (%d,%d,%d)",$ia->vid, $ia->nid, $fid);
      }
      else {
        db_query("UPDATE {content_type_$type} SET $iff = %d WHERE vid = %d",$fid, $ia->vid);
      }
    }
    db_query('DELETE FROM {image_attach} WHERE nid = %d AND iid = %d',$ia->nid,$ia->iid);
    // print_r($ia); die("$old_path $new_path");
  }
  // echo $status ? ': good' : ': bad';
}
// print_r(array_keys($types));


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